Salt: Nature’s Most Edible Rock

 

Presenter: Ken Johnson

Class Dates: Tuesday, Sept. 29

Class Time: 10-11:30 a.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center, OKC

Format: In-Person

Cost: $5

Class Description: Salt is a crystalline mineral, also known as rock salt or halite (NaCl, or sodium chloride). Dissolved NaCl is present in vast quantities in seawater and, when sea water evaporates, layers of halite crystallize from the brine and can form massive deposits of rock salt. Western Oklahoma was the site of such deposition about 275 million years ago, and thus vast reserves of salt are present below the state’s land surface (locally this salt is dissolved by ground water and emerges in salt flats, such as Great Salt Plains in Alfalfa County). Historically, salt has been used as a trade item and as currency; at times it was worth its weight in gold. Although salt was scraped from salt flats in prehistoric times, the earliest processing of salt involved evaporating sea water or water from salt springs, and recovering the salt. Later, mining of underground deposits enabled recovery of large quantities of salt for use and trade. Salt is essential for human and animal life, is used for seasoning and preserving foods, and is the most edible of rocks or minerals. It also is one of the most widely used minerals in manufacturing and industrial processes.

The Oklahoma Judicial System

 

Presenter: Jari Askins

Class Dates: Tuesday, Sept. 15

Class Time: 9:30-11 a.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center, OKC

Format: In-Person

Cost: $5

Class Description: Have you ever wondered about the Oklahoma court system? If so, come and learn how the judicial system is structured and what types of issues are handled by the various courts, how judges are appointed, the duties and responsibilities of the administrator and much more! Led by former Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Jari Askins, this session will focus on the inner workings of the Oklahoma court system.

Tulsa Race Riots

 

Presenter: 

Class Dates: Tuesday, Sept. 22

Class Time: 9:30-11 a.m.

Class Location: Online

Format: Zoom

Cost: $5

Class Description: Tulsa’s Greenwood District, a historically African-American neighborhood since before statehood, was attacked by white mob violence and became known as the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot/Massacre. What’s this history? What happened? Through what and whose lens should we use when looking at this story?  Vanessa Adams-Harris, with the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation, provides a lens to assist a more informed discourse on the Tulsa community and its history.