Cancer: The Disease, Risk Factors, Prevention and New Drug Development

Presenter: J. Thomas Pento

Class Size: 25

Class Dates: Mondays, September 30 - October 21

Class Time: 10 - 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Pkwy, Kairos Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

This course will review information obtained from the Human Genome Project that has led to a better understanding of the biology of cancer development and has revealed new therapeutic targets for the treatment of this disease. In addition, this course will discuss factors known to be involved in the development of cancer, its progression and its spread (or metastatic development).  Further, a presentation of the common risk factors associated with cancer development and the general methods or life styles that are known to reduce the risk of cancer development will be discussed. Finally, an overview of the development of new and potentially more effective anti-cancer drugs will be considered.   

A Brief History of Film Music

Presenter: Joshua Tomlinson, School of Music

Class Size: 25  

Class Dates: Fridays, November 1 - 22 

Class Time: 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Parkway OKC, Kairos Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Stories play a significant role in the lives of each generation, but in the 20th century a new medium of storytelling emerged - one that eventually required several arts to come together in order to create one coherent work.  Join me for an auditory overview of movies, where we will listen to what we see.   

Potpourri of 4 Phantastique Locations: Jerusalem, Antarctica, Grand Canyon, and Panama Canal

Presenter: Ken Johnson, Geologist Emeritus, Oklahoma Geological Survey

Class Size: 25  

Class Dates: Thursdays, September 12 - October 10 

Note*: Class will not meet September 26.

Class Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Parkway OKC, Kairos Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: These four places are among the most phantastique locations in the World!!! Come and learn about the history and importance of 4 places that are (or should be) on most “bucket lists.” These talks are updates of presentations given for OLLI in 2013-14.   

Spies in the Sky: America's Quest for Imagery Intelligence Dominance in the Cold War and Beyond

Presenter: Chris Sartorius, Department of International and Area Studies

Class Size: 50

Class Dates: Mondays, November 18 - December 16

Note*: Class will not meet Nov. 25

Class Time: 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Pkwy, Symposium Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

This course will explore the fascinating history of imagery intelligence during the Cold War and beyond.  During this period, the US developed the world’s first and best classified imaging capabilities which allowed our country to conduct a wide variety of critical intelligence activities, such as, monitoring arms control agreements, quickly identifying threatening military buildups, and tracking individual terrorists.  In this course, we will explore the political and military decisions involved in developing the U-2 strategic reconnaissance aircraft and its use over the Soviet Union from 1955-1960, over Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962, and how this aircraft remains a critical US intelligence asset today by providing indications and warning intelligence and tracking military and terrorist targets.  We will also examine the development and use of the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest manned aircraft in U.S. Air Force history.  Finally, the course will cover the declassified history of the world’s first space-based imaging capability by examining the research, development, testing, and operational use of the Project CORONA system, codenamed DISCOVERER, from the mid-1950s until 1972.  I will use lectures, photographs, videos, declassified imagery and declassified documents to provide a rich learning experience for those interested in learning more about this great period when our leaders exercised strategic vision and inspired amazing technological innovations which enabled the United States collect, process, and analyze critical intelligence to enhance international security.

Discover how the long history of Jerusalem has led to modern conflicts over who controls the city that contains religious sites important for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jerusalem is the location of the most holy of Jewish sites—the First and Second Temples. The life, teachings, and crucifixion of Jesus Christ established the importance of the city to Christianity. Jerusalem also contains the Islamic holy site from which the Prophet Mohammed ascended to heaven to receive revelations from Allah.

Antarctica, the most remote, inhospitable, and exotic continent on our planet, is also the coldest, windiest, highest, and driest of all continents. This talk covers wildlife (mostly penguins), glacial ice, history of exploration, and geologic/geographic setting, based upon the speaker’s 6 trips to the Antarctic Peninsula as an expedition-staff member and lecturer.  The talk will be of equal interest to scientists and the general public.

The Grand Canyon is one of the geologic wonders of the world, and each year about 15,000 persons journey through the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River on rafts. Travelers, in groups of 5–30 people, ride the rapids, explore side canyons, examine geologic history exposed in the canyon walls, and camp and eat along the river on trips that last 3–14 days. Ken has organized and led 5 raft trips through the Grand Canyon. Experience the thrill of exploration and of learning more about geologic processes.

Join in a celebration of the 105th Anniversary of the Panama Canal. The Spanish, French, and (finally) American efforts at crossing Panama are filled with stories of trials and suffering, including the deaths of about 25,000 workers: this struggle resulted (in 1914) in one of the World’s engineering wonders. The Canal saves ±8,000 miles of sea travel around South America, and was (is) crucial to development of the Americas. Panama’s new set of larger locks, completed in 2016, accommodate “Post-Panamax” super tankers.  The speaker has been through the Canal four times.

 

OU Presidents I Have Known: A Portrayal of Their Promises, Priorities and Problems

Presenter: Cal Hobson

Class Size: 50

Class Dates: Thursdays, September 26 - October 24 

Note*: Class will not meet October 3

Class Time: 1 – 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Parkway OKC, Symposium Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The same year John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963 I enrolled at OU and the much revered, longest serving President George L. Cross, who was hired on in 1943, was still on the job, trying to create a university that "the football team could be proud of".  Maybe the recently departed James L. Gallogly was hoping to do the same thing but most folks would say neither completely succeeded.  Such are the priorities, and perils, of The Sooner Nation.

In between those two leaders, the first born into abject poverty in South Dakota but later a University of Chicago Phd botanist at age 23, and the other, an OU law grad birthed in Canada, were five other presidents, all of whom I knew.  Each brought strength, commitment, wisdom but weaknesses as well to the task of running a public institution nestled not far from the usually docile South Canadian River.  However docile is not a word that first comes to mind when thinking about OU.  Actually it may be one of the last. 

For President Cross integration highlighted the 1960s, followed by turbulence in the Vietnam War Era.  Late in the 70s came the arrival - twice - of the Prophet from Pepperdine, William Slater Banowsky.  Esteemed educators named Holloman, Sharp, Horton, Van Horn and several interims were also selected for service by regents, who almost always are white men of considerable financial substance and possessors of more than a passing interest in politics.  The governor appoints these prosperous potentates pending the advice and consent of the state senate education committee on which I served for sixteen years.  Almost without exception being designated as an OU regent was the highlight of their accomplished and successful lives...... or so they often said.    

The Boren quarter century commenced in 1994, ended in 2018, then followed by aforementioned oil executive James Gallogly's less than a year in the saddle before bucking himself off in 2019.  Now former law dean Joe Harroz Jr is temporarily occupying the southeast corner office in Evans Hall and therefore already catching slings and arrows for being an FOB - Friend of Boren who remains under scrutiny  by the Oklahoma Bureau of Investigations for alleged sexual harassment. 

As a  frequent observer of and sometimes participant in the policies. priorities,  and politics swirling around these former presidents, in our seminar I'll tell you of their plans, hopes and dreams for OU, some fulfilled but many dashed during their often frustrating tenure in what I believe to be the hardest public service job in our state.  

The Two Oklahomas: Thirty Eight Native American Indian Tribes… And The Rest Of Us

Presenter: Cal Hobson

Class Size: 50

Class Dates: Thursdays, November 14 - December 12

Note*: Class will not meet November 28.

Class Time: 1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Parkway OKC, Symposium Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The title of this course may sound controversial and for some readers probably even wrong.  To me, after decades of experience working with tribal and state governments, it sounds accurate, definitive and spot on.

During my twenty eight years of elected service in the legislature I was directly involved in at least three major policy issues with one or more of the 38 tribes who call Oklahoma home.  The topics all revolved around the sovereign powers of tribes vis a vis those of the state.   At their core it was always about money, as is usually the case on any matter of importance before the legislature.  

Specifically the controversies in play were compacts, just another word for binding agreements between tribes and our state, and they related to tobacco, motor fuel and the biggest one of all gaming.  All were very complex because each tribe is a separate and distinct nation with unique wants and needs and what looks agreeable to one is a nightmare for another.  Further complicating any negotiation was a dearth of knowledge, background or understanding by Oklahoma lawmakers of tribal law, customs, leaders, history and, critically, treaties from the distant past.  After all how many legislators arrive for duty at the capitol steeped in the intricacies of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek of 1830, the Dawes Act of 1887 or even the difference between the Choctaw Nation and the Choctaw Tribe?  Answer:  None especially years ago when Native American tribes were often viewed by state lawmakers as just other special interests and, in fact, not very special at all.

So, with that as background, in our fall class we will discuss:  How Oklahoma did indeed become "The Home of The Red Man", and not just for the five civilized tribes exiled from the southeast but many from throughout the nation; the complexity and confusion between state and federal statutes; and finally how bitter and longstanding  arguments and stalemates turned into workable, fair and beneficial compacts.

The process related to gaming was especially bumpy at best and often appeared futile but leaders such as Governor Brad Henry, Chickasaw Governor Bill Anoatubby and Treasurer Scott Meacham proved to be statesmen, not politicians, while both tribal and Oklahoma legislators  worked together to craft statutes that mirrored emerging compacts.  And finally, the voters in November 2004 affirmed the multi-year efforts to create honest, transparent and taxable gaming on tribal lands by a vote of 53% to 47%, somewhat of a near miracle in itself.  

Today Oklahoma, also the buckle of the Bible belt, is home to 135 casinos including one, Winstar near Thackerville, that boasts it is the largest in the world.   Apparently a bunch of those buckles enjoy rubbing up against blackjack and craps tables while trying not to bust over 21 or roll snake eyes! 

Come join Cal and his several guests as they discuss, and maybe cuss, the two states of Oklahoma, one Native American, the other mostly white, with competing but sometimes complementary challenges, goals and opportunities.  We 'bet' you'll enjoy it.

New Faces Leading OKC Forward

Presenter: Mike Adams

Class Size: 25

Class Dates: Wednesdays, September 18 - October 9

Class Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Pkwy OKC, Kairos Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

Oklahoma City is in transition demographically, generationally, and politically.   In the OKC public schools, 60% of the students are non-white.   Oklahoma City has one of the youngest large city mayors in the country and five of the nine elected officials are 40 years old or younger.   The political transition is evidenced by the election of the first Democratic congress person from Oklahoma City in 40 years. 

There is a transition in leadership happening in the private sector, in the public sector, all across the city.  Recent elections have changed the face of the City, County, and State government with the success of several young, diverse, progressive candidates who will bring a different focus and energy to government.   Additionally, we have a new City Manager, new Chief of Police, and several other new leaders.  In this course, we will focus on some of the new local leaders; their background and interests, how they got involved/elected, and their impact on the future of our community. 

Unusual Humans and Their Unusual Brains

Presenter: Celeste Wirsig

Class Size: 25

Class Dates: Wednesdays, September 4 - October 2 

Note*: Class will not meet September 18

Class Time:3 – 4:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Parkway OKC, Kairos Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The human brain is probably the most complex structure on earth.  Human abilities surpass those of most species in the realms of thought process, manual dexterity and creativity.  The human brain takes a minimum of 25 years to reach full development, and during this time things can go very right or very wrong.  We will explore some exceptional people: brilliant people like Albert Einstein, violent people like Theodore Bundy, disabled savants like the identical twins Flo and Kay Lyman and cognitive SuperAgers like Lou Ann Schachner, just to name a few, to find out how their brains made them into what they are: geniuses, serial killers, human calculators and octogenarians with impeccable memories.  But before we delve into these most amazing people, we will learn brain basics: the basic parts and how they work, how the brain develops, and what factors can lead this development to go awry, for better or for worse. 

The Two Oklahomas: Thirty Eight Native American Indian Tribes… And The Rest Of Us

Presenter: Cal Hobson

Class Size: 50

Class Dates: Thursdays, November 14 - December 12

Note*: Class will not meet November 28.

Class Time: 1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: PHF Conference Center | 655 Research Parkway OKC, Symposium Classroom

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The title of this course may sound controversial and for some readers probably even wrong.  To me, after decades of experience working with tribal and state governments, it sounds accurate, definitive and spot on.

During my twenty eight years of elected service in the legislature I was directly involved in at least three major policy issues with one or more of the 38 tribes who call Oklahoma home.  The topics all revolved around the sovereign powers of tribes vis a vis those of the state.   At their core it was always about money, as is usually the case on any matter of importance before the legislature.  

Specifically the controversies in play were compacts, just another word for binding agreements between tribes and our state, and they related to tobacco, motor fuel and the biggest one of all gaming.  All were very complex because each tribe is a separate and distinct nation with unique wants and needs and what looks agreeable to one is a nightmare for another.  Further complicating any negotiation was a dearth of knowledge, background or understanding by Oklahoma lawmakers of tribal law, customs, leaders, history and, critically, treaties from the distant past.  After all how many legislators arrive for duty at the capitol steeped in the intricacies of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek of 1830, the Dawes Act of 1887 or even the difference between the Choctaw Nation and the Choctaw Tribe?  Answer:  None especially years ago when Native American tribes were often viewed by state lawmakers as just other special interests and, in fact, not very special at all.

So, with that as background, in our fall class we will discuss:  How Oklahoma did indeed become "The Home of The Red Man", and not just for the five civilized tribes exiled from the southeast but many from throughout the nation; the complexity and confusion between state and federal statutes; and finally how bitter and longstanding  arguments and stalemates turned into workable, fair and beneficial compacts.

The process related to gaming was especially bumpy at best and often appeared futile but leaders such as Governor Brad Henry, Chickasaw Governor Bill Anoatubby and Treasurer Scott Meacham proved to be statesmen, not politicians, while both tribal and Oklahoma legislators  worked together to craft statutes that mirrored emerging compacts.  And finally, the voters in November 2004 affirmed the multi-year efforts to create honest, transparent and taxable gaming on tribal lands by a vote of 53% to 47%, somewhat of a near miracle in itself.  

Today Oklahoma, also the buckle of the Bible belt, is home to 135 casinos including one, Winstar near Thackerville, that boasts it is the largest in the world.   Apparently a bunch of those buckles enjoy rubbing up against blackjack and craps tables while trying not to bust over 21 or roll snake eyes! 

Come join Cal and his several guests as they discuss, and maybe cuss, the two states of Oklahoma, one Native American, the other mostly white, with competing but sometimes complementary challenges, goals and opportunities.  We 'bet' you'll enjoy it.