Byzantine Icons

Presenter: Dr. Rozmeri Basic, Professor of Art History

Class Dates: Mondays, January 14 – February 25*

*Note: Class will not meet Monday, January 21 

Class Time: 10 a.m. to Noon

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: The image occupies a principal position at the heart of the Eastern Church and it is an organic part of daily services. The icon represents a vision of the invisible and, therefore, a vision founded on divine knowledge which transforms the created work into the miracle-working image. This class will examine the challenging process of producing holiness and divinity through visual works.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Masterpieces of Impressionist Painting

Presenter: Victor Youritzin

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  March 6 – March 27

Class Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-6

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Join OU Art History Professor Emeritus Victor Youritzin in an enriching course to explore “Masterpieces of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Painting.” He will discuss such artists as Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Seurat, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Toulouse-Lautrec, among others. Professor Youritzin will combine fast-paced lectures and hundreds of slides to help you increase your ability to analyze, evaluate, and appreciate individual works of art.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Masterpieces of Impressionist Painting

Presenter: Victor Youritzin

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  April 10 – May 1

Class Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-6

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Join OU Art History Professor Emeritus Victor Youritzin in an enriching course to explore “Masterpieces of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Painting.” He will discuss such artists as Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Seurat, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Toulouse-Lautrec, among others. Professor Youritzin will combine fast-paced lectures and hundreds of slides to help you increase your ability to analyze, evaluate, and appreciate individual works of art.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

American Culture through Film, Part 3: Global Influences on American Cinema

Presenter: Betty Robbins, Retired Professor, Film and Media Studies

Class Dates: Tuesdays,  January 22 – February 26

Class Time: 1 to 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: As a nation of immigrants, America carries forth influences in the arts from all over the world, and notably so in film. This course will screen international films that have directly shaped the movies we see in American theaters. We will sample films in German Expressionism, Italian Neo-Realism, French New Wave, and from the great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa, and relate those films to current and past films from Hollywood.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Gilbert and Sullivan: Their Genius and Genesis – Part 2

Presenter: Marvin Beck

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  January 23 – February 27

Class Time:9:30 a.m. to Noon

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: The next in-depth exploration of the first seven operettas (of their total 14 works) including: Princess Ida, The Mikado, Ruddigore, Yeoman Of The Guard, The Gondoliers, The Grand Duke,and Utopia Limited.In this course, we will listen to, watch, read, discuss and enjoy the comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan.  The operetta presentations will be shown with subtitles. These operettas have become, by far, the most-performed theatrical productions for almost 150 years. They introduced innovations in content and form in their operas that directly changed the development of musical theatre. They also influenced political discourse, literature, film and television. We will learn something about what was transpiring in the United Kingdom during the Victorian Era and the corresponding history we were experiencing in the United States.  To completely understand all the parody, humor and sophistication found  in Gilbert and Sullivan, you must be somewhat aware of the political, social, historical, judicial, governmental, religious and cultural conditions of the time, as well as the global literature, events and music of the era. Watching and listening to these comic operas is in itself a learning experience of how these topics can be critiqued and discussed in such a conservative environment as 18th century Victorian England. Participants will sample Gilbert and Sullivan operettas performed by the very best professional and amateur groups from all over the world.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Enjoying the Cinemas of New Zealand and Australia

Presenter: Andrew Horton, Jeanne H. Smith Professor of Film and Media Studies, Professor Emeritus

Class Dates: Thursdays,  January 24 – February 28

Class Time: 1 to 3:15 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Yes, the cinemas of “Down-Under” (New Zealand and Australia) have been so captivating for years! This six week class takes on memorable films from each country for viewing and discussion.

We will view, discuss and read about the vibrant, engaging and award-winning cinemas of New Zealand and Australia. The selected films include, from New Zealand, Peter Jackson’s Heavenly Creatures(1994), Niki Caro’s Whale Rider(2002) and Harry Sinclair’s The Price of Milk(2001). And from Australia, we will enjoy Phillip Noyce’s Rabbit Proof Fence (2003), Stephan Elliott’s Priscilla Queen of the Desert (1994) and Scott Hicks’ Shine (1997). These films embrace humor and drama, the indigenous populations of Maoris in New Zealand and aborigines in Australia as well the incredible landscapes that really do become characters as well.

Andrew Horton is an award-winning screenwriter and the author of 30 books on film, literature and culture including many with a comic focus including Laughing Out Loud: Writing the Comedy Centered Screenplay (U of California Press, 2000). One script is Brad Pitt’s first feature film, Dark Side of the Sun (1996).

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Broadway, American Musical Theater – “The British Invasion”

Presenter: Marvin Beck

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  March 27 – May 1

Class Time: 9 a.m. to Noon

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This seminar is another adjunct to the series of seminars, Broadway: American Musical Theater, which featured hundreds of video clips that support the historical content. Here is the opportunity to watch and discuss the key complete filmed productionsof some of the most important Broadway shows that exemplify the growth and development of the Broadway Musical genre.  This six-week seminar will feature glorious movie adaptions of: Oliver! (1997), Evita (1996), Le Miz (2012), and Mama Mia! (2008), and live theatre productions of ‛CATS’ (combined presentations from Broadway and London’s Westend), and Phantom of the Opera (Albert Hall 25th Anniversary Presentation).

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Yoga, Meditation, Philosophy, and Healthy Living Skills

Presenter: Anita Mann

Class Dates: Tuesdays, February 12 – March 12

Class Time: 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-5

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Learning and practicing a few of these skills will not only help improve your vitality but also will help reduce stress, restore calm and inner peace, improve fitness and flexibility, and aid in managing symptoms of chronic health conditions. We’ll explore a holistic lifestyle—practicing poses and peaceful moving meditation and discussing yogic philosophy, life purpose, and like- minded healthy-living choices. This gentle class is both for beginners and those with experience, progressing from discussion format, to chair poses, and to wall and yoga mats. Class size will be limited.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Understanding Your Grief and Bereavement

Presenter: Eric Vaughan

Class Dates: Tuesdays,  March 26 – April 16

Class Time: 1:30 to 3 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Grief is a lot more than just feeling sad, and the process of bereavement is something we just don’t get over in three days of a clearly defined process. If a loved one has passed away and you’d like to learn about the complexities of grief and the process of healing, join us for this informative course. The instructor served as a hospice counselor for 14 years and has companioned hundreds through the grieving process from all types of death. Although we’ll address the emotional side of grief, please note that is NOT a support group per se, but a chance to learn from the wisdom of those who didn’t “get over it,” but healed and did get through it.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Is Our Food Killing Us?

Presenter: Celeste Wirsig, Neuroscience

Class Dates: Thursdays,  May 9 – 30

Class Time: 3:30 to 5 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course will cover:

  1. How our bodies digest and utilize food
  2. Basic nutrition requirements
  3. A review of all the food additives in current food products that are detrimental to our health, what these additives do to our bodies and how to avoid them.

The course will have a workshop for participants to bring in some of their favorite foods for analysis.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

History of U.S. Intelligence from Colonial America to the Civil War

Presenters: Chris Sartorius and Ula Wildfield, Department of International and Area Studies

Class Dates: Fridays,  February 1 – 22

Class Time: 1 to 3 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course is designed to trace the history of U.S. intelligence from the American Revolution through the U.S. Civil War. We will explore the creative use of espionage to collect and analyze intelligence to help America gain its independence from Britain as well as counterintelligence activities to uncover spies working against the colonists. We will also see how intelligence was key in helping preserve the Union in a period of great internal crisis. The course will examine the interesting personalities on both sides of the intelligence  war and the fascinating tradecraft employed to ensure critical military and political information reached key decision-makers. Take a step back in time and discover how U.S. intelligence functioned in an era before the United States was a major international player—before the creation of a large, centralized intelligence structure reliant on technical collection capabilities.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Was the U.S. Founded as a Religious (Christian) Nation?

Presenter: Charles Wende, NASA

Class Dates: Fridays,  February 8 – 22

Class Time: 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: 

This course will address the colonial history of the separation of church and state in the U.S. Topics presented will include:

  1. The religious environment in the colonies and its evolution
  2. The people involved and their thoughts
  3. The documents leading to our Constitution
  4. The Constitution itself and the Bill of Rights
  5. The post-1791 aftermath (e.g., unfinished business).

Discussion is encouraged.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Pilgrimage Trail to Santiago De Compostela: History, Architecture, and Sculpture

Presenter: Susan Caldwell

Class Dates: Mondays,  February 4 – March 11

Class Time: 10 a.m. to Noon

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-3

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: 

Week 1: Relics and pilgrimage sites in the Middle Ages

  • The significance of relics and pilgrimages to visit them
  • History of Santiago de Compostela as the site of the relics of St. Jacques
  •  Short readings and discussion of excerpts from Roman du Mont-Saint-Michel and Chanson du Roland, and other     medieval writings about pilgrimage

Week 2: Architecture and Sculpture along the Trail to Santiago de Compostela

  • Early Pre-Romanesque architecture in Spain.
  • Importance of the trail for the development of Romanesque architecture.
  • The French Benedictine monastery Cluny and its role in developing the trail.
  •  The Leonese dynasty and its role.

Week 3: Church Portals and their sculpture

  • Early portal development along the trail; iconography of the portals.
  • Viewing of film “’And They Sang a New Song’: Twenty-four Musical Elders at Santiago de Compostela,” an interdisciplinary film made by Caldwell and Eugene Enrico of the School of Music).
  • Study of the west portal of Santiago (1188); discussion of the film—its art and music.
  • Other sculptures of the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse on the trail.

Week 4: Important Architectural Monuments on the Pilgrimage Trail in Spain

  • San Isidoro of León
  • San Martín of Frómista
  • San Pedro de Jaca and Castillo de Loarre (Reconquista)

Week 5: Pilgrimage Plan Churches

  • What is a “pilgrimage plan”?
  • Sainte-Foye de Conques, France
  • Saint-Sernin de Toulouse, France
  • The Benedictine Monastery of Cluny, France
  • Saint-Denis, Paris—attempts to publicize it as pilgrimage site (Pelerinage de Charlemagne).

Week 6: Study of Codex Calixtinus or The Book of St. James

  • History of the book and its five parts.
  • Aymery Picaud and the Pilgrim’s Guide.
  • A last viewing of Santiago de Compostela’s west porch sculpture; have the students analyze it, stylistically and iconographically.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

History of China and Its Place in the World Today

Presenter: Paul B. Bell Jr., Dean Emeritus

Class Dates: Thursdays, February 14 – March 7

Class Time: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course will cover four main topics:

  • Topic 1: Chinese History and Culture
  • Topic 2: U.S.-China Relations
  • Topic 3: Chinese Governments (historical and contemporary)
  • Topic 4: Chinese interactions with the world

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

OLLI Discussion Group

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  January 23 – May 8*

*Note: Class will not meet Wednesday, March 20

Class Time: 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-5

Class Cost: No cost

Class Description: A discussion group is forming to meet weekly on Wednesday mornings for OLLI members who would like to share their ideas, feelings and concerns about what’s going on in our world. The purpose is fellowship and learning together through sharing of concerns and ideas while responding to others’ initiation of other ideas. This is not your typical OLLI course led by a faculty member. YOU become the leaders and decide what to talk about. The course will be led by one of Norman’s greatest conversationalists. Come grab a cup of coffee and settle in for stimulating conversation. Other than OLLI membership, there is no cost to attend this course. The sessions are limited to 21 OLLI members and registration is required to attend.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Introduction to the Modern Short Story: 21st Century Women Writers

Presenter: Chris Allen Carter, English

Class Dates: Fridays,  February 1 – March 1

Class Time: 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course is an introduction to select examples of modern short fiction, focusing on five women writers who have risen to prominence in our new century and who now rank among our most highly regarded fictionists. We will meet five times and read the following:  Feb. 1: Sandra Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek (1991), excerpts, Feb. 8: Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies (1999), excerpts, Feb. 15: Edwidge Danticat, Krik? Krak! (1995), excerpts, Feb. 22: Zadie Smith, White Teeth (2000), excerpts, Mar 1: Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers (2013), excerpt. The course will be a mix of informal lecture and discussion. At the first class, you will be given a packet of the readings. We will plunge right into the Cisneros selections. There is no prerequisite for this course. I have taught four previous Osher courses, but this is a brand new course with different authors and different stories.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Constitutional Studies Book Club

Presenter: Katy Schumaker

Class Dates: Fridays, February 1, March 1, April 5, and May 3 

Class Time: 9 to 11 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

NOTE: First Session will be held in A-1

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: The Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage at OU brings together faculty members in history, political science and law to explore the history, politics and ideas of the U.S. Constitution. Join Katy Schumaker, assistant professor in IACH, along with guest faculty from around the university, to discuss four of the most interesting, exciting and important books in the field of American constitutional history.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Elementary, My Dear Watson

Presenter: Brittney Brown, English

Class Dates: Tuesdays,  February 5 - 26

Class Time: 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: We will study the world’s most famous detective, starting with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original novels, then moving on to the BBC television series and Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell series. Get ready to investigate what makes Sherlock Holmes such a great sleuth and uncover why we still love him over 130 years later.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Heroes and Villains in Television, Film, and Literature

Presenter: Katy Krieger

Class Dates: Thursdays,  February 7 - March 14

Class Time: 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course aims to explore the intricacies behind heroes and villains in film, television, and literature. We will look at why we are attracted and interested in the dichotomy of heroes and villains, and what each brings to the stories we love. We will then look deeper into these heroes and villains to see what makes them tick; this will include an exploration of their actions, psychology, language/discourse, relationships, and even the visual information we get about each of these characters and what shapes them into heroes and villains. We will move throughout time and develop a sense of historical and cultural influences that shape our ideas about heroes and villains and change our perception of them (especially as we grow, develop and even age). For example, we might discuss influences of the Satan/God dynamic, changing ideals in the Victorian era, and post-1945 turns in the American fabric of storytelling. Heroes in this course might include: Hercules, Nancy Drew, Atticus Finch, Harry Potter, Elizabeth Bennet, and James Bond. Villains in this course might include: Richard III, Voldemort, Hannibal Lecter, the Joker, the Evil Queen, and the Wicked Witch of the West. However, the instructor is completely open to the recommendations of the students and their interests guiding the work of the course.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

The Mexican Short Story

Presenter: Julie Ann Ward

Class Dates: Thursdays,  February 7 – 28

Class Time: 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-3

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course offers participants an overview of the 20th-century Mexican culture and history through the study of its short fiction. The course is divided into four sessions, each focusing on a master of the short story: Rosario Castellanos, Elena Garro, Elena Poniatowska, and Juan Rulfo (Readings in English).

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and American History

Presenter: Curtis Foxly

Class Dates: Thursdays, February 7 – 28

Class Time: 2 to 4 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course investigates the history surrounding L. Frank Baum’s original novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Originally published in 1900, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was a children’s book loaded with political commentary about the state of America at the turn of the century. This course will investigate the history surrounding the book, the state of the country in 1900, and will decode the hidden messages along the Yellow Brick Road. We will end the course by watching the 1939 film and seeing how Hollywood adapted the story to fit a new audience.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Mystery Makers

Presenter: Almira Grammer

Class Dates: Fridays, February 8, March 8, April 12, May 10

Class Time: 10 a.m. to Noon

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A Conference

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: There’s nothing better than reading a good mystery, especially when the lightning is flashing, the thunder is rolling and the wind is rattling the windowpanes. In Mystery Makers, we will read and discuss four British crime novels full of manor houses, quaint villages, quirky characters and charismatic inspectors. However, beneath this bucolic façade lurks danger and deception. We will also discuss the evolution of the crime novel—who writes it, who reads it and why. So, sharpen your sleuthing skills and your powers of deduction and join us in solving a murder so foul.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Thackeray’s Vanity Fair

Presenter: Lisa A. Seale, English, OU Extended Campus

Class Dates: Wednesdays, March 27 – May 1

Class Time: 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, published in the same year as Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights (1847), brought us the charming, scheming anti-heroine Becky Sharp. It went on to inspire many a film and mini-series, excerpts from which we’ll watch to compare Thackeray’s 19th-century views of his heroine (and, through her, the society he satirizes), with those of the 20th and 21st. Please read the book in advance (we’ll be using the Oxford World Classics edition).

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Oklahoma’s Weather and Climate (2.0)

Presenter: Amanda Kis, Meteorology

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  January 16 – February 6

Class Time: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-3

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: We will explore how Oklahoma’s diverse climate and often-hazardous weather are rooted in its unique physical geography and influenced by atmosphere and ocean dynamics at great distances. We will apply what we learn to high-profile hazardous weather events and, as time allows, see how Oklahoma’s climate is expected to change.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Country Music and the Rhetoric of Nostalgia

Presenter: Kalyn Prince

Class Dates: Fridays,      January 25 – February 15

Class Time: 3:30 to 5 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This seminar investigates the deep connections between country music—its songs, artists, and history—and nostalgia. Country music offers a unique case study for exploring how nostalgia is used to create meaning in our lives and motivate us to certain actions. We will examine important figures in country music’s history in order to see what their works reveal about the persuasive power of nostalgia. Prepare to analyze Merle Haggard, Loretta Lynn, Garth Brooks, and many more. Cowboy boots are optional but encouraged.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Governor-Elect Kevin Stitt: Who Is This Guy and What Are His Plans for Oklahoma?

Presenter: Cal Hobson

Class Dates: Mondays,  January 28 – February 18

Class Time: 1 to 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A Conference

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Beats me. The only thing I know for sure is what Mr. Stitt HAS promised us for over a year, which is: “Our state’s turnaround starts right here, right now.” Great! Other similarly hopeful hints include his admirable goals of insuring Oklahoma becomes a top-10 state in everything good, reversing our too-often inclusion on lists of everything bad, providing another teacher pay increase, making everyone healthier, improving our infrastructure, never favoring one industry over another (good luck with that) and promising not to raise taxes.  So far, what’s not to like?  However, dozens of hot- or at least warm-button issues related to gun control, school and agency consolidation, abortion, the environment, tribal gaming compacts, reapportionment and many other legislative proposals are sure to end up on his desk for signature or, less likely, a veto. After all, Republicans have earned super majority numbers in both the House and Senate while purging themselves of many Platform Caucus lawmakers and replacing them mostly with teachers. So, what could possibly go wrong during The Outsider’s honeymoon with Sarah and their six as they settle into the mansion?  Kevin Stitt, our 28th Governor, will take office in Jan. 2019 and this seminar starts the same month. Together, we’ll watch his state of the state speech, track early legislative initiatives and hear from guest speakers who know him best. Of course, pollsters, reporters, partisan party promoters and yours truly will also offer opinions and commentary.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

The 2019 Oklahoma Legislature

Presenter: Cal Hobson

Class Dates: Mondays,       April 1 — April 22 

Class Time: 1 to 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A Conference

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Elections matter, and the 2018 vote reaffirmed the continued demise of the Democratic Party in the Oklahoma Legislature at the state capitol. Here are the numbers: 76 Republicans in the House, 25 Democrats, revealing a net loss of three seats. The math is even worse in the Senate, populated by 39 elephants and only 9 donkeys. This reflects a continuing rejection of the Democratic Party that previously dominated politics in Oklahoma for over 100 years. Yet some pockets of azure can be found in three metropolitan counties—Cleveland, Oklahoma and Tulsa. In rural areas, it’s all blood red except small blobs of blue in distant LeFlore, Ottawa and Sequoyah counties. Worth noting, these pick-up seats were due to crimson-colored incumbent departures. Conversely, Minority Leader and 10-year veteran Steve Kouplen (D) Beggs was dispatched by a Republican challenger who spent NOT ONE PENNY on his campaign for the House. Steve dispensed $37,000 in a losing effort and still had $57,000 unspent in his campaign account when the polls closed.  Ironically, but predictably, the 51-seat advantage Republicans now enjoy in the lower chamber is precisely the number held by Democrats when I first was elected in 1978. So our governing trifecta, that being control of the House, Senate and executive branch, remains in place at the capitol as well as Republican occupancy of every statewide position.  Sounds like cooperation, consensus and harmony will surely reign on 23rd street going forward. But remember, this political power structure is exactly the same that has dominated over the last decade, a period when many lawmakers ran afoul of the law or were turned out of office in record numbers.  So put on your helmet, strap tight a seat belt, maybe even occasionally cover your eyes and ears, but do join Cal Hobson and his special guests for a rollicking good time this spring as we discuss, and sometimes cuss, politics Oklahoma style.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

The Apostle Paul in Historical Context

Presenter: Jill Hicks-Keeton, Religious Studies

Class Dates: Thursdays, January 24 – February 14

Class Time: 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B Conference

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course explores the life and letters of the apostle Paul, a Jew living in the first-century Roman empire whose writings are now the oldest texts in the New Testament. We will examine Paul’s letters in their first-century historical context, attempting to reconstruct the circumstances that gave rise to his authorship and to discover what his letters reveal about the origins of Christianity.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Survey and Comparison of Taoist, Buddhist, and Vedanta Meditation Methods

Presenter: Phillip Joy

Class Dates: Thursdays, March 28 – May 2

Class Time: 2 to 4 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: 

This course will examine the major lines of thinking of these three world philosophies and draw out the similarities of meditation goals and methods from the received wisdom. Classes will include PowerPoint presentations on related cultural and theoretical background information interspersed with instructor-led short periods of meditation practicum.  Phil Joy’s Meditation Background and Training:  Graduating MSEE from the University of Connecticut in 1967, I joined IBM Space Systems Center and finally found myself with enough free time to pursue a developing interest in meditation and its roots in Eastern philosophy. I had taken a three-credit course in History of Religion as an undergraduate elective. That was the beginning of the beginning of my interest. So, with the new and luxurious free time one finally secures after leaving university, I started reading lots of background books, Alan Watts material being the most notable. And of course, I started experimenting with meditation techniques on my own.  IBM transferred me to Manassas, Va. in 1970, which gave me automobile access to all the meditation-related activities of the Washington D. C. area. There, I indulged in shopping for training in many methods/styles: Hatha yoga, Iyengar yoga, Integral yoga, Kriya yoga (initiated disciple), Siddha yoga, Kundalini yoga, Tibetan Buddhism and Taoist practices (northern school of Complete Reality initiated disciple). The latter became extra important because of the deep, complex and esoteric practices of breathing and chi circulation throughout the body. In 1987, after initiation into the Gold Mountain Taoist sect under Master Wang Yen-nien, I succeeded in obtaining an IBM transfer to relocate to Taipei, Taiwan to continue my studies with Master Wang directly and to also learn from him the Yang Family Michuan version of tai chi with 127 postures which I now teach as part of the OU OLLI program.  Once relocated to Taiwan, I also started to frequent the Chan (Zen) centers in the area, participating in meditation training classes and taking multi-day intensives in remote mountain temple retreats. Eventually, I took refuge with Chan Master Sheng Yen, who I take as my primary teacher in Zen. Ten years later in Oklahoma, I also took refuge with the Chan (Zen) center in Oklahoma City, Buddha Mind Monastery.  For OU meditation participants, I keep my Taoist and Buddhist training in abeyance and present a more modern, secular style like Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The MBSR approach allows one to engage with the present moment of awareness and behold its contents without any form of judgment of those contents. This simple approach trains the mind to participate in normal life activity with diminishing emotional reactions which can be the result of mental and subsequent emotional projection that usually serves no one. The instructor will explore a method of keeping focus on the movement of diaphragmatic breath as it presents from the hara energetic center below the navel, integrating breath observations with thought observations. The two factors synergistically working together keep the mind from wandering. Such holding to an inner presence of self dissipates stress and stimulates dopamine- and serotonin-mediated states of calm, satisfaction, happiness and health... nature’s medicine.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Introduction to Buddhism

Presenter: Ralph Doty, Professor Emeritus, Classics and Letters

Class Dates: Thursdays,    April 4 – April 25

Class Time: 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: Although it may be the fastest-growing spiritual movement in this country, Buddhism remains a mystery to most Americans. Not entirely a religion, a philosophy, or a form of therapy, it is in some sense all three. This course will examine the basic teachings of Buddhism, the differences between the main schools—including a brief look at Zen—and how Buddhism is adapting to America (and vice versa).

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Principles of Drug Action

Presenter: Thomas Pento, Professor Emeritus

Class Dates: Wednesdays, January 30 – February 20

Class Time: 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: This course will present an overview of the principles of drug action in the body. This course will discuss factors known to be involved in the action of drugs in the body such as; drug absorption, distribution, uptake and storage in body tissue, drug metabolism, major routes of drug excretion, drug interactions and antagonism. In addition, the action of drugs producing biological or therapeutic activity within end organ tissue at specific receptor sites and other common mechanisms of drug action will be reviewed. Further, a presentation of the action of several drug classes commonly used for pain and inflammation such as the non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDS) and steroids will be reviewed to further illustrate these principles of drug action within the body.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Potpourri of Four Phantastique Locations: Jerusalem, Antarctica, Grand Canyon, and Panama Canal

Presenter: Ken Johnson, Geologist Emeritus

Class Dates: Thursdays,     April 18 – May 9

Class Time: 10 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A Conference

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: These four places are among the most phantastique locations in the world! Come and learn about the history and importance of four places that are (or should be) on most bucket lists. These talks are updates of presentations given for OLLI in 2013-14.  Easter is approaching! Discover how the long history of Jerusalem has led to modern conflicts over who controls the city that contains religious sites important for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jerusalem is the location of the most holy of Jewish sites—the First and Second Temples. The life, teachings, and crucifixion of Jesus Christ established the importance of the city to Christianity. Jerusalem also contains the Islamic holy site from which the Prophet Mohammed ascended to heaven to receive revelations from Allah. Antarctica, the most remote, inhospitable, and exotic continent on our planet, is also the coldest, windiest, highest, and driest of all continents. This talk covers wildlife (mostly penguins), glacial ice, history of exploration, and geologic/geographic setting, based upon the speaker’s six trips to the Antarctic Peninsula as an expedition-staff member and lecturer. The talk will be of equal interest to scientists and the general public.  The Grand Canyon is one of the geologic wonders of the world, and each year about 15,000 persons journey through the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River on rafts. Travelers, in groups of five to 30 people, ride the rapids, explore side canyons, examine geologic history exposed in the canyon walls, and camp and eat along the river on trips that last three to 14 days. Ken has organized and led five raft trips through the Grand Canyon. Experience the thrill of exploration and of learning more about geologic processes.  Join in a celebration of the 105th Anniversary of the Panama Canal. The Spanish, French, and (finally) American efforts at crossing Panama are filled with stories of trials and suffering, including the deaths of about 25,000 workers. This struggle resulted (in 1914) in one of the world’s engineering wonders. The Canal saves ±8,000 miles of sea travel around South America, and was (is) crucial to development of the Americas. Panama’s new set of larger locks, completed in 2016, accommodate “Post-Panamax” super tankers. The speaker has been through the Canal four times.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration

Living in a Digital Age – The Power of Technology and Internet

Presenter: JP Morgan, Information Technology

Class Dates: Thursdays,  January 24 – February 28

Class Time: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $40

Class Description: We are living in the digital age, where access to information is only a small part of what we use the internet for. In this class, we will talk about what the internet means for us today, the things we can accomplish, and most importantly, how we can stay safe and secure in these digital times.

Registration

Register Online

Print and Mail Registration