The Jolly Life of the Etruscans 

Presenter: Rozmeri Basic, Art History 

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Mondays, September 9th - October 14

Class Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This course examines the origin of the visual arts of the Etruscans. Enigmatic and rather different from other ancient European civilizations, the Etruscan artistic production continues to challenge understanding and knowledge of cultural influences across the Mediterranean.

The Two Oklahomas: Thirty Eight Native American Indian Tribes… And The Rest Of Us

Presenter: Cal Hobson

Class Size: 120

Class Dates: Mondays, October 21 – November 11

Class Time: 1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | A Conference Room

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The title of this course may sound controversial and for some readers probably even wrong. To me, after decades of experience working with tribal and state governments, it sounds accurate, definitive and spot on. During my twenty eight years of elected service in the legislature I was directly involved in at least three major policy issues with one or more of the 38 tribes who call Oklahoma home. The topics all revolved around the sovereign powers of tribes vis a vis those of the state. At their core it was always about money, as is usually the case on any matter of importance before the legislature. Specifically the controversies in play were compacts, just another word for binding agreements between tribes and our state, and they related to tobacco, motor fuel and the biggest one of all gaming. All were very complex because each tribe is a separate and distinct nation with unique wants and needs and what looks agreeable to one is a nightmare for another. Further complicating any negotiation was a dearth of knowledge, background or understanding by Oklahoma lawmakers of tribal law, customs, leaders, history and, critically, treaties from the distant past. After all how many legislators arrive for duty at the capitol steeped in the intricacies of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek of 1830, the Dawes Act of 1887 or even the difference between the Choctaw Nation and the Choctaw Tribe? Answer: None especially years ago when Native American tribes were often viewed by state lawmakers as just other special interests and, in fact, not very special at all. So, with that as background, in our fall class we will discuss: How Oklahoma did indeed become "The Home of The Red Man", and not just for the five civilized tribes exiled from the southeast but many from throughout the nation; the complexity and confusion between state and federal statutes; and finally how bitter and longstanding arguments and stalemates turned into workable, fair and beneficial compacts. The process related to gaming was especially bumpy at best and often appeared futile but leaders such as Governor Brad Henry, Chickasaw Governor Bill Anoatubby and Treasurer Scott Meacham proved to be statesmen, not politicians, while both tribal and Oklahoma legislators worked together to craft statutes that mirrored emerging compacts. And finally, the voters in November 2004 affirmed the multi-year efforts to create honest, transparent and taxable gaming on tribal lands by a vote of 53% to 47%, somewhat of a near miracle in itself. Today Oklahoma, also the buckle of the Bible belt, is home to 135 casinos including one, Winstar near Thackerville, that boasts it is the largest in the world. Apparently a bunch of those buckles enjoy rubbing up against blackjack and craps tables while trying not to bust over 21 or roll snake eyes! Come join Cal and his several guests as they discuss, and maybe cuss, the two states of Oklahoma, one Native American, the other mostly white, with competing but sometimes complementary challenges, goals and opportunities. We 'bet' you'll enjoy it.  

OU Presidents I Have Known: A Portrayal of Their Promises, Priorities, and Problems

Presenter: Cal Hobson  

Class Size: 120

Class Dates: Mondays, September 9 – 30 

Class Time: 1 – 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | A Conference Room

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The same year John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963 I enrolled at OU and the much revered, longest serving President George L. Cross, who was hired on in 1943, was still on the job, trying to create a university that "the football team could be proud of". Maybe the recently departed James L. Gallogly was hoping to do the same thing but most folks would say neither completely succeeded.  Such are the priorities, and perils, of The Sooner Nation. In between those two leaders, the first born into abject poverty in South Dakota but later a University of Chicago PhD botanist at age 23, and the other, an OU law grad birthed in Canada, were five other presidents, all of whom I knew. Each brought strength, commitment, wisdom but weaknesses as well to the task of running a public institution nestled not far from the usually docile South Canadian River. However docile is not a word that first comes to mind when thinking about OU. Actually it may be one of the last. For President Cross integration highlighted the 1960s, followed by turbulence in the Vietnam War Era. Late in the 70s came the arrival - twice - of the Prophet from Pepperdine, William Slater Banowsky. Esteemed educators named Holloman, Sharp, Horton, Van Horn and several interims were also selected for service by regents, who almost always are white men of considerable financial substance and possessors of more than a passing interest in politics. The governor appoints these prosperous potentates pending the advice and consent of the state senate education committee on which I served for sixteen years. Almost without exception being designated as an OU regent was the highlight of their accomplished and successful lives...... or so they often said. The Boren quarter century commenced in 1994, ended in 2018, then followed by aforementioned oil executive James Gallogly's less than a year in the saddle before bucking himself off in 2019. Now former law dean Joe Harroz Jr is temporarily occupying the southeast corner office in Evans Hall and therefore already catching slings and arrows for being an FOB - Friend of Boren who remains under scrutiny by the Oklahoma Bureau of Investigations for alleged sexual harassment. As a frequent observer of and sometimes participant in the policies. priorities, and politics swirling around these former presidents, in our seminar I'll tell you of their plans, hopes and dreams for OU, some fulfilled but many dashed during their often frustrating tenure in what I believe to be the hardest public service job in our state. Yes even harder than that of governor. Enroll and I, plus several guests, will explain why.

Unauthorized Guide to the Museum of the Bible 

Presenter: Jill Hicks-Keeton, Religious Studies 

Class Size: 120

Class Dates: Tuesdays, September 10 - October 1

Class Time: 1 -2:30pm

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | B Conference Room

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Featuring photos and videos from D.C.’s new $500 million museum dedicated to the Bible (founded and funded by the Oklahoma Green family), this course provides analysis of the controversies the Museum of the Bible has spawned in the national press and in the academic field of biblical studies.

Family History at Your Fingertips for Free

Presenter: Jan Davis, School of Library and Information Studies 

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays,  September 10 - October 1 

Class Time: 3 – 4:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Exploring your family and community history becomes easier each day as more and more historical records collections are digitized and made accessible online.  Learn about what Oklahoma libraries, archives and museums, along with other institutions around the nation, are doing to bring your family and community history to your fingertips.    

OLLI Movie Club

Presenter: Jerry Jerman, Extended Campus (retired) 

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays,  September 10, October 8, November 12, 2019; February 11, March 10, April 14, 2020

Class Time: 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Since the earliest days of movies, filmmakers have drawn upon the stage as a source for scripts. This year, OLLI Movie Club will look at movies based on plays (it’s not necessary to read the play before each class—but you can if you want to!). Each session begins with an introduction to the movie, movie viewing, and a vigorous discussion. Join us! 

Movies to be viewed and discussed include: Key Largo (1948), On the Town (1949), Detective Story (1951), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), Stalag 17 (1953), and Heaven Can Wait (1978).

Taoist Meditation

Presenter: Phil Joy 

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Thursdays,  September 12 - October 17

Class Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This class will provide a symposium discussion format to flesh out the subtle meanings of the Taoist teachings contained in The Secret of the Golden Flower as translated by Thomas Cleary. The primary focus will be on Taoist meditation objectives and techniques. Prior purchase of the text is advised. Program will be 40 minutes discussion, 10 minutes break and 40 minutes low intensity meditative practice in the chair to further absorb the meaning of discussion topics.

Mystery Makers

Presenter: Almira Grammer 

Class Size: 70

Class Dates: Fridays, September 13, October 18, November 8, December 13

Class Time: 10:00 a.m. – noon 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Conference B Room

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: There’s nothing better than reading a good mystery, especially when the lightning is flashing, the thunder is rolling and the wind is rattling the windowpanes. In Mystery Makers, we will read and discuss four British crime novels full of manor houses, quaint villages, quirky characters and charismatic inspectors. However, beneath this bucolic façade lurks danger and deception. We will also discuss the evolution of the crime novel—who writes it, who reads it and why. So, sharpen your sleuthing skills and your powers of deduction and join us in solving a murder so foul.

Exploring Contemplative Practices

Presenter: Anita Mann

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays, September 17 – October 8

Class Time: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-1

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

Discover how a contemplative practice might enrich your life.  We’ll use The Tree of Contemplative Practices created by The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society as a springboard for discussions.  Grounded in awareness, communication, and connection the categories of practice include stillness, movement, creative, generative, activist, relational, and ritual.  We’ll study and experiment with specific practices such as walking meditation, visualization, journaling, yoga, meditation, council circles, volunteering, and creating sacred spaces.

 

Modern But Still Mythic: Six Contemporary Films on Texas

Presenter: Betty Robbins, Retired Professor

Class Sizes: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays, October 1 - November 5

Class Time: 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-4 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: As often as Texas life is made mythic on screen, it is deconstructed to show some radically tawdry behavior…like murder and mayhem.  Yet the Lone Start State remains Giant in character, setting, plot and pathos.  The Big Bend area of Texas I the most isolated area in the continental US and has been the setting for a number of highly compelling and successful films.  This course will examine six Texas films and discuss the depiction of the mythos, ethos, pathos - and chaos - of the desert west represented in the characters that populate these films. Films will be selected from the following:  Fandango; Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmie Dean, Jimmie Dean; Lone Star; No Country for Old Men; Hud; Texasville; The Last Picture Show; Hell or High Water; Three Burials for Melquiades Estrada; There Will Be Blood; The Wild Bunch; Tender Mercies; Blood Simple.

The First World War

Presenter: Melissa K. Stockdale, History  

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Wednesdays, September 18 – October 23

Class Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-3 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

More than 15 million people died in the First World War, a conflict that profoundly shaped the course of the 20th century. This class will look at the causes, conduct, and outcomes of the war, with attention paid not only to battle and the soldiers’ experience, but also to life on the home front in history’s first “total war.”  

Women Offenders: Crime and Punishment   

Presenter: Joe Bogan  

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Wednesdays, October 2 – 30

Class Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

Though crime is an overwhelmingly male phenomenon, women account for about 7% of prison inmates in the United States today, or about 110,000 women.  This course will explore gender differences with regard to crimes committed, sentences received, response to the punishment of imprisonment, and rehabilitation of women.  In terms of sentencing, the dysfunction of our current systems will be explored.  I will present theoretical views and research results on the relevant issues.  What the experience of prison is actually like for inmates will be presented in granular detail.  Conversely, I will talk about what it is like to work with incarcerated women, from my point of view as a former prison warden.  The idea that offenders should be incarcerated "AS punishment and not FOR punishment" will be explored.  What programs are helpful to women offenders will be examined. As importantly, I will integrate the stories of individual women in prison to illustrate the issues involved.     

Chinese Culture and Communication

Presenter: Paul B. Bell, Jr., Dean Emeritus 

Class Size: 70

Class Dates: Thursdays, October 3 - November 7

Class Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2/4

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This course will provide an introduction to Chinese culture and how that culture affects Chinese thinking and Chinese communication styles. A Chinese person’s sense of identity is based on shared cultural beliefs and practices that have developed over 5000 years, largely free of Western influence. This common cultural heritage confers on Chinese distinctive ways of perceiving themselves and the world around them and of interacting with others. In this course we will examine the various features from which Chinese culture derives, including: a syncretic system of beliefs; reading, writing and thinking in Chinese characters; the centrality of the family; filial piety and respect for ancestors; personal relationships based on human feelings and a sense of mutual obligation; and dialectical thinking. Then we will go on to consider how Chinese culture has affected the development of Chinese communication practices and how it continues to affect interpersonal communication to the present day.

The Nuclear Arms Race and the American West

Presenter: Curtis Foxley, History

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Thursdays, October 3 – 24

Class Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-5

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This course investigates how the nuclear arms race transformed the American West between 1941 and 1990. We will examine how nuclear weapon development and testing transformed western environments and cultures. Topics include: the Manhattan Project, uranium mining in New Mexico, nuclear testing in Nevada, aerospace culture in Southern California, protest movements surrounding nuclear weapons development, and nuclear pop culture. This course is based on the instructor’s long-awaited Ph.D. dissertation.

Before Downton Abbey: Anthony Trollope's Barchester Towers

Presenter: Lisa Seale  

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Thursdays,  October 3 – November 7 

Class Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

Anthony Trollope, the 19th century novelist who wrote over 50 novels in his spare time and invented the red pillar letterbox while serving the British postal service, was a funny, irreverent chronicler of upper and middleclass life in London and the British countryside. Julian Fellowes did the same for Edwardian Britain with Downton Abbey. Those who love that series can find new characters to love in Barchester Towers(1857), made into a Masterpiece series, The Barchester Chronicles (1982). Together we’ll watch scenes from both series to see where Fellowes, a Trollopian at heart (who also served as the Trollope Society’s president), may have taken inspiration. And we’ll look at what Trollope and Fellowes have to say about love and money—and true character. Please read Barchester Towers in advance of the first meeting.

The Wisdom Years, a Guide to Intentional Aging 

Presenter: Barbara S. Boyd 

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays and Wednesdays,  October 22 - 23

Class Time: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-4

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: THE WISDOM YEARS, A GUIDE TO INTENTIONAL AGING by Dr. Barbara S. Boyd This course is designed more as a workshop than a lectureship, using the book (title of this course) as our guide for discussing, sharing, learning and creating new paths into the Wisdom Years. This course invites all ages to reflect on the time in life when we move from institutional obligations into the intentional stage of life where we have freedom and time for other long-desired pursuits. We will discuss the process of moving from employment to those years when we seek adventure, play, humanitarian work and depth—wisdom. We will also discuss the more practical matters of aging such as wills, health care, downsizing our spaces, family dynamics as well as planning for our death. This course will certainly look at some somber issues, but humor will be the key to our reflections and sharing of these tough topics. (The text may be purchased from Barnes and Noble or Amazon, or there will be books for sale the day of the course.)

Understanding Grief

Presenter: Eric Vaughan 

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  October 16 - November 6 

Class Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Grief is a lot more than just feeling sad, and the process of bereavement is something we just don't get over in three days of a clearly defined process.  If a loved one has passed away and you'd like to learn about the complexities of grief and the process of healing, join us for this informative course.  The instructor served as a hospice counselor for 14 years and has companioned hundreds through the grieving process from all types of death.  Although we'll address the emotional side of grief, please note that is NOT a support group per se, but a chance to learn from the wisdom of those who didn't "get over it," but healed and did get through it.

Mark Twain Today   

Presenter: Daniel Snell

Class Size: 35  

Class Dates: Tuesdays, September 10 - October 8

Class Time: 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

First Session: River Rats.  What I learned in my youth and how I wrote about it in Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn.

Second Session: Out West.  What I learned in Nevada and California and the Sandwich Islands.  Writing, roughing it and lots of little diversions.

Third Session: Out East.  How I got to Europe and the Holy Land and wrote Innocents Abroad, met my wife, and had twenty years of delight.

Fourth Session: My try at the past.  My historical novels.  Imperialism and race.  What I think about our country today and tomorrow.

Fifth Session: God and me.  And the devil.  And my family.   

Geologic Processes that Impact Earth History and Humans: Plate Tectonics, Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Tsunamis, and Glaciers

Presenter: Ken Johnson, Geologist Emeritus 

Class Size: 120

Class Dates: Thursdays,  October 24 – November 14

Class Time: 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A Conference

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This Senior Seminar includes presentations on four of the geologic processes that have had, and will have, major impacts upon life on Earth.  Non-technical discussions, illustrated with many beautiful slides—and a bit of humor—are well-suited for the interested layperson.  Come and learn more about major geologic processes, and how they have impacted Earth history and Oklahoma—this seminar is an update of presentations given at OLLI in 2014. 

Plate Tectonics, the driving force of our dynamic Earth, entails the movement of 7 large plates and a number of smaller plates of the Earth’s crust at speeds of about 1-2 inches per year. These crustal movements, well-documented since the early 1960s, explain the location and intensity of most of Earth’s volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunamis. 

Volcanoes are openings in the Earth's crust that allow molten rock (lava), volcanic ash, and gases to escape to the surface. The Earth currently has about 1,500 “active” volcanoes (activity within the past 10,000 years), and almost all of them are located along, or near, the tectonic- plate boundaries. The United States has more than 150 active volcanoes, mostly in Alaska and to a lesser extent in the western third of the lower 48 states.

Earthquakes and Tsunamis are the most devastating of Earth processes. Most large earthquakes occur at tectonic-plate boundaries, and are triggered by movement of plates past or under each other. Earthquakes that occur beneath the oceans, or in coastal areas, can generate tsunamis when large masses of the earth are thrust up (or down) and trigger displacement of large volumes of water. Waves created by water displacement move across the ocean at about 500 miles/hour and then surge over coastal areas.

Glaciers, Fjords, and Icebergs, how they form, and the landforms they create.  Most common in the polar regions, and in many mountain areas throughout the World, vast ice sheets and glaciers cover about 10% of Earth’s land area.  While “flowing” slowly from higher to lower elevations, glaciers have ground away at the underlying Earth and have sculpted the landscape of much of the World today.

Better Brain

Presenter: Thomas Thompson 

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Wednesdays, November 6 – December 18

*NOTE: Class will not meet on November 27

Class Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: “The Feldenkrais Method is based on principles of physics, biomechanics and an empirical understanding of learning and human development”***.  We will be working on movement puzzles framed around related scientific data to help integrate the right and left hemispheres of our brain. We will explore many different movement options best illustrated by Michael Merzenich’s (PhD Neuroscientist) statement “It is better to try to move to a point in space in 100 different speeds in 100 different ways  … than to move 200 times in the same way to get to that point in space.”  We will be developing more kinesthetic awareness, extending ranges of motion  and expanding our day to day comfort.  

Spies in the Sky: America's Quest for Imagery Intelligence Dominance in the Cold War and Beyond

Presenter: Chris Sartorius, Department of International and Area Studies

Class Size: 70 

Class Dates: Wednesdays, November 20 – December 18

Note*: Class will not meet on November 27

Class Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2/4

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

This course will explore the fascinating history of imagery intelligence during the Cold War and beyond.  During this period, the US developed the world’s first and best classified imaging capabilities which allowed our country to conduct a wide variety of critical intelligence activities, such as, monitoring arms control agreements, quickly identifying threatening military buildups, and tracking individual terrorists.  In this course, we will explore the political and military decisions involved in developing the U-2 strategic reconnaissance aircraft and its use over the Soviet Union from 1955-1960, over Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962, and how this aircraft remains a critical US intelligence asset today by providing indications and warning intelligence and tracking military and terrorist targets.  We will also examine the development and use of the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest manned aircraft in U.S. Air Force history.  Finally, the course will cover the declassified history of the world’s first space-based imaging capability by examining the research, development, testing, and operational use of the Project CORONA system, codenamed DISCOVERER, from the mid-1950s until 1972.  I will use lectures, photographs, videos, declassified imagery and declassified documents to provide a rich learning experience for those interested in learning more about this great period when our leaders exercised strategic vision and inspired amazing technological innovations which enabled the United States collect, process, and analyze critical intelligence to enhance international security.

Medieval Art and Music: Increasing Complexities

Presenter: Eugene J. Enrico, Professor, School of Music; Susan H. Caldwell, Professor Emerita, School of Visual Arts

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays and Thursdays, December 3, 5, 10, 12

Class Time: 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | A-2 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Interconnections between art and music and increasing complexity of both art forms in four different periods:  a) Pre-Romanesque, including Charlemagne’s palace at Aachen, St.-Riquier of Centula, and plain chant, Gregorian chant, the liturgical drama “Play of Daniel”; b) Twelfth-century Renaissance, including development of polyphony in music at Notre Dame of Paris, and development towards Gothic architecture and sculpture at St.-Denis and Chartres’ west façade; c) music, sculpture and pilgrimage at Santiago de Compostela; and d) High Gothic architecture and art at Chartres, Reims, and Amiens cathedrals, and Ars Nova music and Guillaume de Machaut. 

History of the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Industry

Presenter: Dan Boyd

Class Size: 35  

Class Dates: Mondays, October 21 – November 11

Class Time: 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

Oil and gas have been produced in Oklahoma for over a century.  Providing the incentive to turn the Territory into a State, the geology of Oklahoma has combined with science and politics to create a fascinating story of how we got where we are today.   

The Progressive West: Social Movements of the Twentieth Century   

Presenter: Derek W. Donwerth and Chelsea Burroughs, History  

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Wednesdays, August 21 – September 11

Class Time: 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

The American West played a pivotal role in passing progressive legislation during the early twentieth century, and for many has remained a progressive region.  This course will examine the role that westerners played in important twentieth century social movements, within the region and nationally.  Major topics in the course will include organized labor, women's rights, and direct democracy, as well as many others.   

 

Poetry Club

Presenter: David Anderson, English

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Mondays, 2019: Aug. 26, Sept. 30, Oct. 28, Nov. 25  2020: Jan. 27, Feb. 24, Mar 30, Apr. 27

Class Time: 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The Poetry Club will specialize in the close analysis of English verse.  Each month, we will discuss a specific poet from English literary history, focusing on one or more short poems.  Anderson will begin with a brief discussion of the poet in question and will guide the group through an analysis of the works.

 

Masterpieces of French Painting 1800-1870 and 19th-Century American Painting

Presenter: Victor Youritzin, Professor Emeritus, Art History

Class Size: 35 

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  Section I: Aug. 28 - Sept. 18.  Section II: Oct. 9 - 30 

Class Time: 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-6

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

As a counterpart to Professor Youritzin's annual class on Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting, this course presents masterpieces of French painting from 1800 to the start of Impressionism and treats such movements as Classicism, Romanticism and Realism.  Artists discussed will include David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Daumier and Courbet (along with Goya, Constable and Turner outside France).  Also examined is the history of 19th-century American painting, with special attention to such artists as Homer, Eakins, Sargent, Cassatt and Whistler.

 

A Brief History of Film Music

Presenter: Joshua Tomlinson, School of Music

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Fridays,  September 20 - October 11

Class Time: 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Stories play a significant role in the lives of each generation, but in the 20th century a new medium of storytelling emerged - one that eventually required several arts to come together in order to create one coherent work.  Join me for an auditory overview of movies, where we will listen to what we see.

The Second World War We Ought to Remember

Presenter: Lance Janda, Social Sciences 

Class Dates: Fridays,  August 30 - October 4 

Class Time: 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The Second World War is among the most romanticized and mythologized periods in American history.  Even today, almost 75 years after the guns fell silent, the war remains a staple of American popular culture, and a formative ideal for many as we ponder our values and the role of the United States in the broader world.  But do we remember the war correctly?  Is it a singular moment of American exceptionalism and a high water mark in our history, or have we glamorized the war - along with the men and women who endured it - so much that the true significance of the conflict has been lost?  This course will examine those and many other questions, and consider the chasm between the Second World War that most of us remember, and the Second World War we should honor instead.

Introduction to the Modern Short Story: European Early High-Modernists

Presenter: Chris A. Carter, English

Class Size: 35 

Class Dates: Fridays,  August 30 - September 27

Class Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This course is an introduction to modern short fiction, focusing on select works by European writers of the early high-modernist period.  We will meet five times and read the following:  Aug. 30: Anton Chekhov, Gooseberries (1898), Sept. 6: Joseph Conrad, The Secret Sharer (1910), Sept. 13: James Joyce, The Sisters (1914), Sept. 20: Virginia Woolf, The Mark on the Wall (1921), Sept. 27: Katherine Mansfield, The Daughters of the Late Colonel(1921). The course will be a mix of informal lecture and discussion.  At the first class, you will be given a packet of the readings.  Then we will plunge right into the Chekhov story. There is no prerequisite for this course.  Although it is the sixth in my series of OLLI courses and does treat three authors we have looked at before (Chekhov, Conrad, Joyce), it is a brand new course with different stories and different approaches to these stories.

 

Unusual Humans and Their Unusual Brains

Presenter: Celeste Wirsig-Wiechmann

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Fridays, September 6 – 27

Class Time: 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room A-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: The human brain is probably the most complex structure on earth.  Human abilities surpass those of most species in the realms of thought process, manual dexterity and creativity.  The human brain takes a minimum of 25 years to reach full development, and during this time things can go very right or very wrong.  We will explore some exceptional people: brilliant people like Albert Einstein, violent people like Theodore Bundy, disabled savants like the identical twins Flo and Kay Lyman and cognitive SuperAgers like Lou Ann Schachner, just to name a few, to find out how their brains made them into what they are: geniuses, serial killers, human calculators and octogenarians with impeccable memories.  But before we delve into these most amazing people, we will learn brain basics: the basic parts and how they work, how the brain develops, and what factors can lead this development to go awry, for better or for worse.

Corporate Corruption

Presenter: Mary Carter, Retired Banker and Federal Reserve Bank Examiner

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Thursdays, October 3 – 24

Class Time: 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

In order to preserve their positions of dominance in the market, many corporations have learned over the  years how to manipulate the economic system of the United States to their advantage.  In some cases their business model exploited weaknesses in the economy to enrich themselves while disadvantaging others.  In addition, they developed ways to hide money using shell companies and overseas bank accounts in order to commit tax fraud.  This class will reveal the many ways that these schemes have been carried out, the impact on the economy, and explore the possible ways to change things in the future. Resources used in the class:  Griftopiaby Matt Taibbi, Democracy in Chainsby Nancy MacLean, and Secrecy World by Jake Bernstein along with various magazine articles.  Required reading:  There is no required reading.

Greek Mythology

Presenter: Ralph E. Doty, Emeritus Professor of Classics and Letters

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Wednesdays, October 9 - 30

Class Time: 10 a.m. – 11:30am 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | C-2 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Classical Greece has faded away, but it left its stories behind.  We read them in our schools and watch them in films and television shows.  What did they mean to the Greeks?  What do they mean to us, and why are they still vital to our imaginations after three thousand years?  Take this class and find out!  Our text will be Edith Hamilton's Mythology. 

The Life of Will Rogers

Presenter: Marvin Beck

Class Size: 35  

Class Dates: Fridays, October 11 – November 15

Class Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2 

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: 

A cowboy entertainer that became the most popular man in this country.  The most revered and highest paid performer in the Ziegfeld Follies - Movie superstar (71 films) - Most popular Radio star - Wrote more than 4000 nationally syndicated newspaper columns - Bestselling author - Globe-trotting Goodwill diplomat, humanitarian and so much more. The New York Times called him "America's Aristophanes," Will Rogers was the most beloved humorist of his time.  If as he often remarked, he never met a man he didn't like, also true is that Rogers never met a man he didn't like to make fun of.  Everyone from congressmen and Presidents to Hollywood movie moguls and wealthy industrialists bore the brunt of his gently lacerating wit--and seemed to be charmed in the process.  So popular did Rogers become--through dozens of films, a daily column that ran for nine years in newspapers across the country, and countless lectures and stage performances--that he was often urged to run for Congress and even the Presidency.  Upon receiving a mock appointment as Congressman-at-Large for the whole United States, Rogers protested, "I regret the disgrace that's been thrust upon me here tonight.  I've tried to live my whole life so that I would never become a congressman." This seminar will set the stage, using commentary, video, graphics and quotes to understand and appreciate the background, heritage, culture and history that helped to immortalize Oklahoma's favorite son.   

 

Holy War: History of the Crusades 

Presenter: Jacob Lackner

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Thursdays, September 5 - 26

Class Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: This course will examine the medieval crusading movement, which began in 1096 as a European Christian attempt to capture the city of Jerusalem and its surroundings from Muslims and ended in 1291 with the capture of the last European stronghold in the Levant.  We will discuss the way the Crusades impacted medieval European society,as well as the major battles and turning points of the Crusades

Registration

The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Famine, Plague, War and Death in 14th-Century Europe

Presenter: Jacob Lackner

Class Size: 35

Class Dates: Tuesdays, November 5 - 26

Class Time: 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. 

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room C-2

Class Cost: $45

Class Description: Things were so bad in 14th-century Europe that many people thought the apocalypse was imminent.  In the Book of Revelation, John of Patmos discusses four figures riding horses who represent various disasters that have to occur at the end of times.  Fourteenth-century Europeans saw these horsemen in the events of the century, which include the Great Famine (1315 - 1317), the first waves of the black death (1346-1353), and the Hundred Years War (1337-1453).  The chaos and upheaval created by these events would reshape Europe, in many ways bringing an end to the medieval period.  This course will discuss these events and the impacts they had on society

OLLI Discussion Group

Class Size: 25 

Class Dates: Wednesdays,  September 11 - December 4

Note*: Class will not meet November 27 

Class Time: 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Class Location: CCE Forum Building | 1704 Asp Avenue, Norman | Room B-5

Class Cost: No Cost

Class Description: 

The discussion group will meet weekly on Wednesday mornings for OLLI members who would like to share their ideas, feelings and concerns about what's going on in our world.  The purpose is fellowship and learning together through sharing concerns and ideas while responding to others' initiation of other ideas.  This is not your typical OLLI course led by a faculty member.  YOU become the leaders and decide what to talk about.  The course will be led by one of Norman's greatest conversationalists.  Come grab a cup of coffee and settle in for stimulating conversation.  Other than OLLI membership, there is no cost to attend this course.  The sessions are limited to 21 OLLI members and registration is required to attend.