What Can You Do with a Degree in Lifespan Care?


woman who earned a degree in Lifespan Care Administration

Whether it’s due to better living conditions, medical advances or both, people are living longer than ever. In fact, new research shows one day there may be no limit to how long we can live.

While the idea of near immortality may be appealing to some, this kind of longevity comes with its own set of challenges.

As healthcare providers try to cope with a growing population that wants to live longer, healthier lives, there’s a growing need for specialized healthcare in all stages of life. Those who have a desire to work in a caregiving setting may want to pursue a Bachelor of Arts in Lifespan Care Administration.

“A lifespan care administration degree is for those interested in caregiving across the lifespan,” said Christine Young, a recruitment specialist for OU’s College of Professional and Continuing Studies. “The degree better prepares those who want to work in a hospital or caregiving facility, whether it’s in a for profit or nonprofit agency. It can also help propel you toward a master’s degree or a career in the health care field.”

Lifespan care focuses on three areas—pediatrics, adolescence and geriatrics. Students will find that careers abound in each area, whether they work as care facility staff or administrators.

Lifespan care focuses on three areas—pediatrics, adolescence and geriatrics. Students will find that careers abound in each area, whether they work as care facility staff or administrators.

Graduates with this degree will be prepared to work in or manage infant and child care facilities, including daycare facilities, special care facilities or nurseries. As the quality and quantity of care continue to increase for children with special needs, graduates also may find themselves working for agencies who cater to children with special needs, or with families who have children with special needs.

Another area that may experience a growing need for specialized caregivers is adolescent care.

Graduates with a lifespan care administration degree may work in treatment centers or youth camps. They also may find themselves working for state agencies that give rehabilitation assistance to adolescents with disabilities or with agencies or families who have teenagers with autism.

Finally, as Baby Boomers enter retirement age, there will continue to be a growing need for caregivers in the geriatric field. A lifespan care degree will prepare students to work in assisted living facilities, nursing homes or home health agencies, as well as hospitals or physicians’ offices as support personnel for the elderly.

Young said PACS’ lifespan care administration program also offers a Registered Behavior Technician training course. A registered behavior technician (RBT) helps people with autism and other behavioral obstacles. The eight-week, online course prepares students to take the National RBT exam administered by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board.

“As people live longer, the need for caregivers specializing in all stages of the lifespan will continue to increase,” said Young. “A degree in lifespan care administration can put students on the right path to succeed in this growing field by preparing them to provide quality care in a wide range of jobs.”

For more information about our online bachelor's degree in Lifespan Care, visit our website or contact our recruiters directly

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Tami Althoff

Tami Althoff holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She is a reporter with more than 20 years’ experience working for newspapers, including The Oklahoman. She has covered everything from breaking news to local music and art. She loves sports, especially OU football and basketball games, where she often embarrasses her children by yelling too loudly.