Class Highlight - Engaging Ecology


Class Highlight - Engaging Ecology

What class?

LSTD 4700 - Engaging Ecology

Why is it cool?

As population growth, species extinction and other ecological changes occur at an increasing rate, our daily decisions and lifestyle choices may have more of an impact on the world than we think, good or bad.

As students consider religion as one possible avenue to change how people see and treat the planet, they may gain a greater respect for the earth and the environment along the way.

Engaging Ecology begins with the assumption that our environment is severely polluted, and the problem must be addressed before it’s too late. While examining issues like sustainability and eco-justice, students will survey various world religions to see what they can offer in terms of an ecological ethic to guide people’s response to the crisis.

For example, the principles of Native religion will be studied to see what they say about the earth and its importance, and Buddhism and Hinduism will be explored for what their texts and traditions express regarding concern for the earth and its people.

“Religions traditionally serve as worldviews or the guiding principles of people or their adherents,” said course instructor Nina Livesey. “In that way, religions have authority and an influence on people, on their beliefs in general.”

Students will be encouraged to think critically and collaborate with one another by sharing their ideas through online discussion. As students consider religion as one possible avenue to change how people see and treat the planet, they may gain a greater respect for the earth and the environment along the way.

Talk to your advisor to see if this class might be right for you, or see what else is offered by the OU Extended Campus College of Professional and Continuing Studies.

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Tami Althoff

Tami Althoff holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She is a reporter with more than 20 years’ experience working for newspapers, including The Oklahoman. She has covered everything from breaking news to local music and art. She loves sports, especially OU football and basketball games, where she often embarrasses her children by yelling too loudly.